Agamemnon’ amazes audiences in Beijingmnon premiered

  The bilingual drama Agamemnon, a co-production of the National Theater Company of China a

nd the National Theater of Greece, represents a refreshing innovation for Chinese theater lovers.

  The play by ancient Greek tragedian Aeschylus, often called the “father of tragedy”, is the first part of his only extant tr

ilogy. It is a story about patriarchy, matriarchy, revenge and justice. In the story, Agamemnon s

acrifices his daughter to win the Trojan War. After his triumphant return, the king is slain by his wife and her lover.

  Directed by Stathis Livathinos, artistic director of the NTG, Agamemnon embodies a pr

ofound cooperation between China and Greece. “To have a bilingual presentation of a play means yo

u hear two languages, two kinds of actors, two schools. Of course it’s a very big risk. But it’s better to go with a risk t

han with safety. Because I really believe the National Theater should always be the avant-garde,” he said.

  ”Agamemnon is a part of something bigger that doesn’t belong only to Greece. This

is a theatrical and artistic meeting of two civilizations on stage,” Livathinos added.

lirxb.cn

Critics of the Trump administration’s unconventional North

  Korea policy have assailed the President and his advisers for failing to get the North to agree to anything specific at

their June meeting — the first between a North Korean leader and a sitting US president — in Singapore.

  The US contends that talks have brought the two sides back from the brink of war and created an unprecedented opportunity to cut a deal.

  A handful of analysts believe there is an agreement to be had but question whether either side has the flexibility to compromise.

  Trump touts trust with Kim in TV interview

  ”So far, the negotiations have reduced tensions for a year and slowed the advancem

ent of the arsenal marginally. The trick now is to make those limits permanent and to make th

em strict limits,” said Adam Mount, an expert in nuclear deterrence at the Federation of American Scientists.

  Lee, the former AP Pyongyang bureau chief, likens Trump and Kim’s next meeting to a chess match. The first su

mmit helped establish a “leader-level relationship,” but Hanoi will be time to move beyond smiles and pleasantries.

  ”They (US) need to go into this next summit prepared and having done their homework,” she said.

  ”I know how tough the North Koreans are, and if you don’t understand the history and the motivations of the No

rth Koreans, it’s very easy to be swayed by the propaganda and the drama of the moment.”

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It’s all about Huawei. World’s biggest mobile tech show g

  Over the next four days, about 100,000 people in Barcelona are expected to traipse through the halls of Mobile Worl

d Congress, one of the tech industry’s biggest events. All the biggest players in the world use it to showcase new products.

  One company really stands out this year: China’s Huawei. Walking

out of the Barcelona airport, there’s a Huawei hospitality stand. The company’s bran

ding dots the city. The lanyards conference attendees wear around their necks are decorated with the Huawei name.

  There’s a good reason everyone is focused on Huawei, one of the world’s largest makers of telecom equipment.

  Huawei is a crucial part of China’s efforts to advance superfast 5G wir

eless networks and today is caught in a life or death battle with the US government.

  The United States claims that Huawei poses a potential national security threat. Last month, US prosecutors revealed cri

minal charges against the company, alleging that Huawei stole trade secrets and worked to skirt US sanctions on Iran.

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So the fact that the to-and-fro is still in progress this far

down the line highlight that there is a shared desire to secure an accord that delivers on the rapport that has been established — also perhaps beyond both side’s expectations.

But it would be getting ahead of the situation to consider the final push tow

ard a consensus on principled, mutually beneficial cooperation all done and

dusted. That consensus, which President Xi identified as the objectiv

e of the talks when he met with the US negotiators after the previous round of neg

otiations in Beijing, has still not been completed, and probably will not be until the two leaders meet to agree on the final det

ails. But there is no doubt that both sides are aware of how momentous such a consensus would be, beyond the tangible rewards it would offer both cou

ntries. For if the two sides can iron out their core differences by abiding by the principles of mutual respect and m

utual benefit, it would reset their relationship in a way that would bode well for the future.

History in the past four decades shows that the two countries benefit in an all-around wa

y from harmonious trade and economic relations, as they provide the ballast for their relationship.

There is obviously still more work to be done. However, if neither side puts a foot wrong, a deal will finally be signed sooner or later.

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photo shared by MP John Lamont showed a smiling Berger

  snapping a selfie of the group as they took their seats in the House of

Commons. But non

e of the group asked a question of the Prime Minister, as she appeared before MPs for her weekly grill

ing, and the defections were barely addressed. The mood in the House of

Commons seemed more subdued than usual.

  The closest May came to acknowledging the issue was when she attacked Corbyn over anti-Semitism in

his party, cited as a reason for some of the defectors leaving his party.

  May said she never thought she would see the day when “a once proud

Labour party was accused of institutional Semiti

sm by a member of that party,” or,

equally, when Jewish people in the UK “were concerned about their future.”

  Responding to those accusations, Corbyn said that “anti-Semitism ha

s no place whatsoever in any of our political parties, in our lives, in our society,” be

fore laying into the Prime Minister for “pretending to negotiate” a Brexit deal with just 37 days to go.

  May, who will travel to Brussels later in the day, maintained that she was still working on alternative arrangements on the

Irish backstop — an insurance policy designed to avoid a hard border between

Northern Ireland and the Republic of Irel

and. She also reiterated her position that a no-deal exit from the EU could only be taken off the table by agreeing a deal.

  Speaking at a press conference later, Allen, Wollaston and Soubry said the Prim

e Minister had been bullied by hard-line Brexiteers onto the brink of a no-deal Brexit.

www.shlf17.com

Nigeria elections: Explosions heard hours before preside

  Multiple bomb blasts rocked the northern Nigerian city of Maiduguri just hours before presidential polls opened Saturday.

  The explosions happened at a camp for internally displaced refugees at around 5 a.m. local

time Saturday, Nigerian army spokesman Onyeama Nwachukwu told CNN. There were no reports of any deaths or injuries.

  ”There was an attack this morning at the camp by the militants, but the military h

as suppressed it at the moment,” Nwachukwu said, adding that the army was still assessing the situation.

  Journalist Simpa Samson told CNN the militants targeted the Teacher’s Village camp in Maiduguri, the capital of Nigeria’s

Borno state.”The military secured the place almost immediately and has stopped our cameraman from fil

ming, no one was hurt because the bombs landed outside the premises,” Samson told CNN.

  Security is often a concern in Maiduguri, a frequent target of terror group

Boko Haram. The city also has a large population of internally displaced refugees.

  The blasts came as Nigerians prepared to cast their ballots Saturday, a week after the country’s presidential and parliamentary elections were une

xpectedly postponed. It was the third consecutive vote to be delayed in Africa’s largest democracy.

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Polls across the country were scheduled to open at 8 a.m

  (2 a.m. ET) and close at 2 p.m. (8 a.m. ET) Saturday, but reports soon emerged of widespread delays.

  In the megacity of Lagos, CNN visited multiple polling stations, all of which opened hours la

ter than planned. Voters said they had lined up for hours before electoral officers arrived with voting materials.

  To cast their ballots Saturday, voters were expected to complete an accreditation process in which officials from Nigeria’s Independent National Elec

toral Commission take their fingerprints and scan their permanent voting cards.

  A nurse told CNN she turned up at a polling station after working a night shift, only to face a long wait.

  ”I am supposed to be resting now, but I came to the polling station (at) 7:30 a.m. thinking they the electoral commissi

on officials) will be here, but it’s two hours now, and they have not come,” Juliet Emoedin said.

  Festus Okoye, a national commissioner for the electoral commission, sa

id stations that opened late would close an hour later, according to the Nigerian Television Authority, the state

shlfat.com

Iranians are paying for US sanctions with their health

  Ali only had two hours to save his baby’s life. He careened through traffic and sped along highway

s to an east Tehran government pharmacy. When he saw some 800 people queued outside the fac

ility, he dropped to his knees. Like him, they were waiting to obtain state-funded medications.

  ”I cried and screamed, begging people to let me get through,” Ali — whom we have not fully identified for security reasons — recalls.

  Eventually, he skipped the line and returned with the medicine in time for his one-year-old daughter, Dory, to recover.The incid

ent happened just as Iran’s landmark nuclear deal with six world powers led by the US was being sig

ned in 2015. It was a moment when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had promised Iranians an easier life, free of me

dicinal and food shortages, and where desperate scenes such as Ali’s outside the pharmacy would become a thing of the past.

  Iran was halting its nuclear program in exchange for international sanctions relief, appearing to turn the pa

ge on a 36-year history of diplomatic and economic

qianpadat.com

The world looks longingly at a post-Trump eraon is CNN’s intern

  If Europe’s leaders, diplomats and security professionals had a vote in the 2020 US presidential elections, it doesn’t see

m likely they’d give it to President Trump. At least, that’s how it seemed at the 2019 Munich Security Conference.

  Hundreds of dignitaries crammed into tight corridors, moving between the modest meeting halls of Munich’s Bayerischer Hof Hotel.

  The event has grown in recent years. As prime ministers and presidents rub shoulders wit

h CEO’s and policy wonks, conversations straddle global differences and attempt to shape the world order.

  Biden says US should remain committed to its allies abroad

  It is an odd, almost old-fashioned mix. It’s rare at global summits these days that repo

rters can mingle with the people they cover and even engage them in casual conversation.

  NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg surprised me, praising my sturdy weather-beating boots and trou

sers. He laughed when I told him he was lucky inside. I was outside, the sun was blazing and, frankly, I was baking.

shlf16.com

Leaving Saudi Arabia is not a simple undertaking for women

  who rebel against the system. Permission is needed from a male guardian for many basic activities, including international travel.

  Reem and Rawan say they had been planning their escape in secret for two years. They didn’t dare discuss it in case they were

overheard, so, instead, they swapped WhatsApp messages, even while alone at night in their shared room.

  Before they fled, the Sri Lanka vacation was just like any other. They wore their niqabs

to the beach and sat away from the surf while their brothers swam and joked. They cooked the meals, and

spent most of their days inside. It was humid. Their niqabs stuck to their skin and made it hard to see.

  ”We travel to move from a box to another box. From home to hotel, nothing will change,” Rawan says. “They will go o

ut, they will live freely, the men, of course we will sit away, watching them doing what they want.”

Their five-year-old sister played in the sand, but their 12-year-old sister, like them,

didn’t. She too was learning that it’s OK to be a girl in Saudi Arabia — until you grow up.

During the trip, Rawan turned 18. The timing was no accident. The vacation was planned with gentle persuasion to co

incide with a birthday that, unbeknown to their mother, allowed Rawan to apply for an Australian tourist visa.

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